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Technical

How much air is enough ?

by André Bobinas

Some will say “think big” but you might find out that’s not always right. “Porting” is the art of generating power by making motor heads flow better. Harley motors act somewhat like a pump so the more efficient the pump the more power you’ll get. But it’s not as easy as just grinding the intake and exhaust ports as big as you can and then installing the biggest valves money can buy to try and generate more horsepower. If it was any idiot with a grinder could be a “head man”. It’s not easy, it’s a complex art.

Basically you are trying to fool the air in thinking the port is straight. A straight port is the one that flows the best but in reality ports are oddly shaped for different reasons : cam location, rocker arm location, and exhaust location. The trick is to maintain velocity. Velocity can be described as air speed and air speed is crucial for a crisp throttle response. Imagine that air is like an axle on a car, when you turn a corner one wheel turns faster than the other. Air acts the same way when it travels through a curved port. The air on the outside wall of the port has a higher velocity than the air on the inside wall of the port. When modifying a port a good “head man” tries to even out this difference. The port size and valve size are chosen in relation to the engine size, i.e., cubic inches, stoke verses bore, cam, as well as the motor application. Street motors need more velocity than big block full racing motors which will be ridden at full throttle.



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Our Readers

Our Readers

Text by Chris Kelly

I can’t 100 % pinpoint the exact time at which I knew I had a passion for vintage choppers. But I know by the time I clued in I was already neck deep into it. I remember seeing my now 1970 Triumph TR6 for sale online. For a week or two I was on the fence whether or not to go take a look. As usual, after talking myself out of it multiple times, I woke up one morning with the one track mind of buying this bike. So a four-hour drive later… yes I know, I’m nuts… I land in the outskirts of Sudbury, Ontario where I have arranged to see the bike in the flesh. I recall the guy opening the door to the garage and there it was in all its glory. Now looking back to that moment I wonder why I thought such a piece of shit was so awesome. I guess when you know absolutely nothing about vintage motorcycles, never mind old British ones, a bike with brutal welds on the frame, oil leaking out of every orifice and a god awful paint scheme it still left me feeling like I did when I woke up that morning, “I had to have it”.

 

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pascal.richard@v2revolution.com



Old School

Old School

By Charlie Lessard

Sixty year old Paul Walsh is truly one of Eastern Canada’s motorcycle authorities. Riding, repairing and building custom motorcycles since the mid-1970s he is a graduate of the American Motorcycle Institute, a former M/C member, was owner/operator of P.W. Custom Cycle in Halifax and now owner/operator of CPN Custom Design in Saint John, New Brunswick. He is also a millwright who works at the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station. Though I first met Paul back in 1993 at the Sherbrooke Bike Show where he was showcasing his very wicked hand-built Pro-Street FXR, I just recently had the chance to sit with him long enough to bring you a little insight into this very busy man’s life. So here it goes…

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International

International

By Liz Leggett

California is an amazing place for creative people and in the land of customs and choppers there are many shops and garages dotting the coastline as well as the Valley. The majestic hills that hug the coast provide a lush and challenging place for bike enthusiasts to ride and cruise in the warm California air. This is where I had travelled aiming to shoot bikes and cars that each showcased different aspects of the culture. As I drove through the mountains I could easily imagine the thrill of riding a bike in Los Angeles, over the hills to Ventura County and to the new home of Cro Customs.

Caleb Owens has been known in the bike world as the two-time winner of the Born Free bike gathering’s First Place Award in the Invited Builders Class which recognized his bikes for their unique style and beautiful simplicity. When I arrived, his latest award winning bike “Yang Yang” was parked in the driveway of his home garage. Peeking inside the garage you could see many Harley engines and a partially built chopper in mid-restoration. “Yang Yang” the 1976 Harley-Davidson FLH Caleb had built is beautifully painted with a vintage colour scheme. The logo of a “Cro” has been worked into the tank as a matte ghost finish. The cafe racer style gives the bike a low stance reminiscent of a race bike and the polished chrome headlight cover sported an almost “art-deco” style.

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Her Say!

Her say!

By Marie-Josée Côté

Some people don’t need an introduction but for my part I knew little about the sisters at Boutin Harley-Davidson. What a great find ! Upon my arrival I felt a strong “family” welcoming, which has been an element of their customer service since the early days of the company – a company that is today entirely run by the three women.

Véronique and I sat down to chat about the history of this family business that is filled with enthusiasm and devotion. Boutin Sport has been established since 1969. Back in the day it dealt with Honda, Suzuki and Yamaha motorcycles as well as the servicing and sale of snowmobiles. It was between 1977 and 1978 that Boutin Sport introduced the Harley-Davidson line to its inventory. The three girls’ parents, Donald and Francine Boutin, ran the business together starting in the early 1970s.

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On the Road

On the Road

Par Robbie Kerr

Kootenay Motorcycle Art flew three client’s bikes and owner Robbie Kerr’s Glasgow Kiss (RMM no. 17 cover bike) to Europe in August 2012. Why ? A two-month tour of southern Europe where they would meet up with the boys from No Nonsense Choppers of Scotland to do some hard riding. A great trip but Robbie decided that this would be the last trip away from the Kootenays during the summer. Besides it made more sense to leave when it is buried in snow for five months. So for the following winter retreat Robbie and his son Stephen set about restoring a tired old Shovel that had been in the family for over a decade. After riding the bike in the south-east British-Columbian Kootenays all summer, it was time to prepare the bike for the tropics. Thailand was the chosen destination.


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