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Technical

making you transmission bullet proof

by André Bobinas

Gears are often regarded as just parts that spin to provide move- ment. Well that couldn’t be farther from the truth. There is a lot to gears. Your gearbox, or tranny, can improve your ride. Have you ever asked yourself why a truck with a 400-horsepower engine can pull a 60,000-pound load or why a Hot Rod with the equivalent horses can’t ? Well the answer is “gears !”

Whether they are inside the tranny or outside the tranny such as when we look at sprockets, gear ratios are all about compromise. I mention “compromise” in many of my articles – sorry you can`t have it all! In the case of ratios we have tall ratios and low ratios. Have you ever asked yourself how come some of these guys with baggers can pull wheelies, yes, lift that bagger straight up like a candle stick ? If you have a look, often the rear sprocket is almost as big as the rim. That’s a very tall ratio gear in effect. Without this little helper you would need a lot more horse- power to achieve this feat, at least 145 cubic inches. On the other end of the spectrum bikes that break land speed records have the opposite...



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Our Readers

Our Readers

By Mad Paris

Rebel, rocker and father who is fanatical about vintage guitars, photography and motorcycles, Antoine expresses his love of life by way of great food. In addition, he is self-taught. Antoine’s obsession with food goes back to a very early age as he watched his father cook spaghetti bolognaise and stroganoff crepes which made his mouth salivate. He has tra- velled around the world as a performing musician, studio musician and musical director. In 1992 he earned platinum al- bums and produced many hits. Inspired by his travels, Antoine published his first book titled “The Rebel Cook” in 2009. It won several prestigious awards inter- nationally. “I wanted a book that stood out from the rest, something with a younger feel, something funny actually that reflected my personality. Shortly after that, I had the idea to create a tele- vision cooking show like no other,” he said. That’s when “the rebel” started to write his concept for his future show. In no time at all the first French Canadian TV food channel made Antoine an offer to host his own cooking and travel show in which viewers follow the globetrotting chef’s culinary adventures through elec- trifying and exotic gastronomic destina- tions. Antoine’s show is now in its fourth season and has quickly earned a loyal following.

 

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pascal.richard@v2revolution.com



Old School

Old School

By Charlie Lessard

Yep, I still get astonished! Even after doing this “old school” gig for the better part of seven years and meeting so many great people from across this land, I still get blown away by the amount of brilliance, fortitude and history found hidden in the shadows of bike shops and motorcycle shows across Canada. My latest “find” was tucked away on Vancouver Island – Qualicum Beach to be more precise, a little town north of Nanaimo. To look at him, you would never think that this mild-mannered dude played a vital part in inspiring and promoting the biker lifestyle on Canada’s West Coast. Stacey Goodman has been riding on two wheels since the early 1960s. Here is his story.

Son of a railroad man Stacey was born right by the tracks in St. Thomas, Ontario. The year was 1949. The “cycle bug” bit him during his first year of High School on account of his Boy Scout buddy Dan Irwin giving him rides on his 250 Yamaha Catalina. “Right from the first ride, I was hooked,” says Stacey. Stacey was sure to be up and ready early in the morning so that he wouldn’t miss his “ride” to school. It wasn’t long before Stacey himself picked up a like new bike and yes, you would be right if you guessed a Harley!

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International

International

By Liz Leggett

I first saw the bikes of Noise Cycles at the Born Free 6 show last year and their 1970’s influenced design immediately caught my eye. They were like some- thing Indian Larry would have ridden in a Japanese remake of the movie Easy Rider. This summer I drove back to California in my 1950 Chevy and at the top of my list of places to go was Noise Cycles. I photographed the Noise shop and bikes and then sat down to talk with T-Bone, a man of few Southern-accented words.

Born and raised in North Carolina, Scott “T-Bone” Jones lived in Ra- leigh till high school then moved with his father to Kill Devil Hills on the Outer Banks. His dad was into bikes and T-Bone followed in his footsteps – in fact just as soon as he could walk. Eventually heading for the West Coast, T-Bone settled in Southern California where he now lives with his wife and three children. He put in hours working for Chica Custom Cycles at first and then went over to Kill City to work with Steg Von Heinz. In 2007 Scott worked as a fabricator at West Coast Choppers making handle bars. “I made T-bars, ape- hangers, wild bars.

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Her Say!

Her say!

By Marie-Josée Côté

Throughout my journey around the globe to meet women who have made an impact in the biker world, I’ve met some interesting, intelligent and hard working ladies to say the least. In this issue of RMM, I am pleased to introduce to our readers a very delightful and intelligent woman named Kerri Cameron. To my knowledge Kerri Cameron is the only female “trick rider” in the Wall of Death motorcycle show in the world at this present time. There have been other famous and daring female trick riders around going back decades but seemingly Kerri is the only one on the list these days. Having seen a Wall of Death show several years ago at the Harley Rendez-vous in Upstate New York, I found it to be very exciting and a thrill to watch, but I have never seen a woman rider perform this death defying act. Let me take you on a tour through the eyes of Kerri Cameron and introduce you to her way of life on two wheels.

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On the Road

On the Road

Par Charlie lessard

The Cabot Trail, named after famed Italian navigator and explorer John Cabot, is a very picturesque motorway that takes you around the greater part of Nova Scotia’s Cape Breton Island. By popular vote it happens to be one of the most famous drives in Canada. Because there are so many scenic overlooks, cultural heritage sites and hiking trails on the Cabot Trail, spending some time planning your tour may make your road trip a much more enjoyable event. The Cabot Trail makes a loop around Cape Breton Island, cutting across the top of the island and closely following the western and eastern coastlines. You can ride the “loop” clockwise or counter clockwise – both directions will provide you with an exceptional motorcycle riding experience. I started my tour from Baddeck after spending the night there. It’s a nice little town with great seafood and a good place to hear Celtic music if you’re into that. Baddeck is also home to the Alexander Graham Bell Museum – very interesting Canadian history. A very well traveled path for many Easterners, Cape Breton’s Cabot Trail is truly a destination that should be marked on all Canadian bikers bucket lists.


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